Services

Adult and Individual Therapy

Couples and Relationship Therapy

Mediation

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) Trauma Recovery

Emotional Transformation Therapy (ETT)

Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) Anxiety Reduction

CADC Alcohol Treatment Outpatient

LGBT Counseling

Aging Individual Counseling


Adult and Individual Therapy
Each person that walks this earth is as unique as every individual handprint. Strengths. Weaknesses. Likes. Dislikes. All are unique to us as individuals. How a person reacts to life stresses is personal as well. Each of us deserves to be treated as the separate and important person that we are.

In Adult and Individual Therapy, it is the therapist’s function to attune to the client’s needs and provide the right approach that will most help them. Adults come to therapy for many different reasons; anxiety, depression, grief, parenting questions, problems in relationships, stress reactions of everyday life, to name a few. How the therapist addresses those issues with the client is unique to each individual and situation. Therefore, no two people will have the same experience in therapy. Therapy isn’t “One Size Fits All”. This personal attention allows adults to focus on their individual strengths and capitalizes on those in order to promote growth and realization of their true potential.

The therapists at the Healing Arts are skilled in many approaches to therapy, are interactive with the client and are continually improving their skills through advanced training and techniques.

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Couples and Relationship Therapy
A relationship is similar to a car. It needs the same routine maintenance and tune-ups. Any time you put two different people together, whether in business, in love, or in any sort of relationship, there are bound to be issues that arise. Each individual has their own methodology. Each individual has their own beliefs. Each individual has their own agenda. That can be a surprise. Often times, we think that if we are loved and if we give love, everything will flow smoothly. And that CAN happen, but generally we must learn the skills that make a great relationship possible. Why?

Because people each bring to the relationship strengths and weaknesses, and in general, most people aren’t very aware of which is which. As adults, we tend to engage in adult relationships the way we saw relationships as a child. We model the adult relationships that were present when we were young. There usually is little time or attention paid to the kind of relationship we are willing to work on with our partner.

Couples and Relationship Therapy can be an excellent way to work through whatever problems may be plaguing the relationship. When two people are present to work on their relationship, the focus is not psychodynamic. The focus is on communication, problem solving and, most importantly, learning the skills of successful relationships. And there are skills to be learned and practiced that promote satisfying relationships. We can learn together with our partner how to have the best relationship. We can learn how to communicate effectively; how to listen skillfully. We can learn how to grow together.

Please note: Relationship therapy is very different from individual work. Where the focus of Individual Therapy is the growth of the individual, the focus of Couples Therapy is the growth of the couple as a unit. And, as each relationship is unique, there is not a “One Size Fits All” approach to Couples Therapy. Each session is focused on the couple and their specific problems/issues. Individual Therapy may be recommended in order to help the couple strengthen their relationship.

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Mediation
Mediation is a way for people to feel empowered in their lives by resolving conflict personally and effectively. Rather than having disputes decided by third parties, Mediation brings together individuals who are invested in the outcome and provides a format for resolution. The purpose of the Mediator in these settings is to act as a neutral third party whose job is to facilitate the discussion, not direct it. Unlike court proceedings, Mediation Sessions are 100% confidential and are held in a neutral, safe setting where both parties can feel free to be active participants in the discussion. The purpose of Mediation is not to determine who is right and who is wrong, but rather to aid participants in reaching their own solutions to the problem(s) at hand. Participation is typically voluntary for these sessions, and for this reason may have more favorable results than court required programs.

Pre- and Post-Divorce Mediation
Pre- and post- divorce mediation helps families move on from divorce and learn together how to relate in this new state of singlehood. Mediation helps restore the sense of individual autonomy and empowers each side to negotiate for themselves and for the best interest of their children. This process is a steep learning curve taking the couple from the entwined state of marriage to a new place of independence and responsibility. Divorce mediation takes about four to six sessions to create a document that outlines the intention of both parties to move forward more confidently.

US Post Office EEO Transformative Mediation
Equal Employment Opportunity laws make it illegal to discriminate against a job applicant or an employee because of the person's race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), national origin, age (40 or older), disability or genetic information. It is also illegal to discriminate against a person because the person complained about discrimination, filed a charge of discrimination, or participated in an employment discrimination investigation or lawsuit.

For United States Postal Service (USPS) employees, the Postal Service offers a mediation program for formal EEO complaints. The USPS pays for external professional mediators to help assist employees and their supervisor or manager with settlement efforts. The mediation is aimed at supporting the parties as they make decisions and allows them to recognize the reasons for others’ actions. It supports improved communication between supervisors and employees and avoidance of unnecessary litigation. If settlement is reached, it is binding for both parties, and the EEO dispute is withdrawn. If no settlement is reached, the employee has the right to continue with the formal complaint process, which may include a hearing.

US Department of Justice Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Mediation
In 1994, the US Department of Justice enacted the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Mediation program. Complaints under both public and private entities can be mediated. Disputes involving barrier removal, accessibility, policy modification or effective communication are most appropriate for mediation.

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Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) Trauma Recovery
While it is fair and accurate to say that the way psychotherapy works on individuals is puzzling, there are certain conclusions that one can draw relating to how the brain deals with trauma. As humans we can’t escape distressing experiences: the loss of a loved one, accidents, even sometimes abuse. When a person is very upset, their brain cannot process information as it does ordinarily. These types of experiences leave deep impressions on our Souls. Talking alone does not change feeling states. The body must also be included in the process of resolution. EMDR is a powerful tool for healing and growth.

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is an integrative psychotherapy approach that has proven effective for the treatment of trauma. EMDR uses bilateral brain stimulation through the use of sight, sound or tapping to resolve memories which can leave us in depression, anxiety, or Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. The introduction of EMDR to the field of psychotherapy was revolutionary in 1989. Promoting and encouraging body awareness as part of the healing process was very radical at the time.

Today, body awareness and the acknowledgement of body memories are seen as essential to changing the emotional state of the client. While it incorporates elements from many different treatment approaches, EMDR seems to have a direct effect on the way that the brain processes information. The goal of EMDR therapy is to process completely the experiences that are causing problems, and to include new ones that are needed for full health. The traumatic memory becomes just a memory. You still remember what happened, but it is less upsetting. EMDR can be thought of as a physiologically based therapy that helps a person see disturbing material in a new and less distressing way.

Some conditions that EMDR can be used to treat are:

  • Panic attacks
  • Complicated grief
  • Dissociative disorders
  • Disturbing memories
  • Phobias
  • Pain disorders
  • Performance anxiety
  • Stress reduction
  • Addictions
  • Sexual and/or Physical abuse
  • Body dysmorphic disorders
  • Personality Disorders

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Emotional Transformation Therapy (ETT)
As human beings we feel wide ranging emotions including fear, anger and depression, but when these overwhelm us and become moods that won’t go away they can control our lives.

Emotional Transformation Therapy (ETT) is a cutting edge therapy for treating trauma, anxiety and stress related illnesses. It uses both light and color to transform emotional states by working with the stress component of physical pain. The technology is complex but the process is simple, and the results are fast, profoundly effective, and best of all lasting. Whatever your situation, this therapy is a way to transform the emotions which are keeping you from enjoying a life of health and emotional well-being.

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Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) Anxiety Reduction
Emotional Freedom Therapy (DFT) is a simple technique that impacts the limbic system (your eyes) in order to reduce anxiety. It can be taught quickly and used in a variety of settings to reduce situational stress such as: test taking, performance anxiety, cravings, and any habitual response that interferes with our well-being. EFT also can be taught to children; helping them to feel more comfortable and at ease in stressful situations.

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CADC Alcohol Treatment Outpatient
Addiction can come in all shapes and sizes. It is an all-consuming beast that takes hold of a person’s mind and body and, ultimately, works to undermine the responsibilities of ordinary life. People fighting an addiction may not even be aware that their behavior is out of control and destructive, causing problems for themselves and others. Substance abuse or dependency has profound effects not only on the individual either currently using or in recovery, but to family members as well.

Initially, counseling focused on how to work with, and support, an individual in their desire to stop using substances. Soon, treatment professionals realized that family members were often left to face their issues of unresolved anger and guilt. But, because the addict was now getting help to face and control their addiction, they no longer had the substance abuse to blame for family problems that still existed.

Certified Alcohol and Drug Counseling (CADC) is a specific designation of addictions counseling. This provides expertise specific to working with individuals and families affected by substance abuse or dependency. In addictions counseling, the opportunity for growth and change is offered to all family members so they may each individually achieve the balanced healthy lifestyle they deserve.

It is estimated that one third of people seeking counseling have been or are currently in a relationship with someone who is alcohol or drug dependent.

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LGBT Counseling
Stigma, in any form, is a serious impediment to the well-being of those who experience it. People who identify as a member of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) community may face stressors that “straight” people are not prone to face. Although there is a higher level of social acceptance and tolerance for alternative sexual orientations and gender identification than there was just 10 to 20 years ago, members of the LGBT community still face prejudice on a daily basis, from homophobia to societal discrimination and prejudice. They may be faced with stressors such as coming out, negotiating family and business relationships, unsupportive family member(s) or dealing with past prejudices or abuse resulting from sexual orientation or gender identity.

All of this can lead to higher levels of depression and anxiety for LGBT folks. In fact, research suggests that LGBT individuals are at a higher risk for addiction or substance abuse. Suicide rates are higher among teens that are gay or lesbian than among those who are heterosexual. For adults, being openly gay in the workplace or public is not always easy. Due to the stigma and discrimination these individuals and couples face on a regular basis, from society, family members, peers, co-workers, even classmates, there is a unique risk for addiction and mood disorders.

Thankfully, more and more members of the LGBT community are seeking therapy. Therapy can help manage the choices and emotions that are, sadly, still inevitable for most LGBT people. Sometimes, the issues hoping to be addressed are related to an individual or couple’s identification in the LGBT community. But LBGT individuals and couples often seek therapy for the same life struggles that a heterosexual person or couple may face: coping with loss, stress, anxiety, depression, relationship issues, and trauma. Gay couples fight over many of the same things straight couples fight about – money, sex, the in-laws, quality time, etc. – even if they may argue over issues related to being a member of the LGBT community, coming out and having a public identity as a gay couple, that a straight couple would not have to face. The issues that plague them may have very little to do with sexual or gender orientation and identification, or they may be very closely tied to their LGBT identity.

Given the stressors that LGBT groups must confront, finding and feeling comfortable with a therapist who can provide a caring environment where you can openly discuss work, life or relationships issues is extremely important. These specialized therapists can offer some much needed support and healing. It is imperative that one find a knowledgeable, open and respectful therapist that can help with a wide variety of life issues, including those specific to being a member of the LGBT community.

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Aging Individuals Counseling
Aging is a natural process. All will experience this eventually. But that doesn’t mean that it comes free of challenges, both for the aging individual and their family. Older adulthood brings with it a new set of life challenges. Older adults may have great difficulty:

  • Transitioning to retirement
  • Facing their mortality
  • Dealing with frailty, changes in physical strength and mobility, or medical conditions
  • Coping with the loss of a loved one
  • Avoiding isolation in the wake of deaths of loved ones and friends
  • Coming to grips with a loss of independence
  • Finding enjoyable and meaningful activities

Depression and anxiety are common illnesses that can occur when life presents situations that feel particularly challenging.

It can be very helpful to speak with a counselor about the fears and concerns that often accompany life changes. Counseling can help older adults connect with their life experiences and strengths, find new sources of enjoyment and meaning, find new support systems. It can help aging individuals face their fears of death, and can help them deal with grief over the deaths of loved ones and friends. This can greatly improve their ability to adapt to life changes and create new goals for the future.

Counseling can also be beneficial to family members who are adjusting to having an increased role in supporting and caring for an aging loved one. Adult children are often part of the "sandwich generation" that struggle to balance the needs of aging parent(s) with their own needs at work and home, as well as the needs of their own children. Therapy for these new caregivers can help them learn to deal with their emotional issues tied to their new role, can teach new ways to overcome communication missteps (especially for those caring for an aging individual with dementia or Alzheimer’s), and can guide them towards community resources.

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